Saint Patrick's Church Schola

Lenten 2006 Class -- Classical Spiritual Disciplines

Friday, January 23, 2004

For some reason our Shout Out is not working. Ryan P. wrote up this response. Good thoughts.
I'm from a small town that probably is the same or smaller than Wilmore. (We don't even have stoplights. :) Everyone in the town is at about the same economic level as far as I know. I only know one family that is on welfare (though I'm sure there are others), and the most we do for them is to give them a ride to the grocery store. On Thanksgiving and Christmas we give out food baskets and some gifts. I don't know what to do with the destitue because outside of one college weekend mission trip to a homeless shelter in the inner city of Indianapolis, I've never met a person like that. When I have given change to bums on occasion, I've been told by friends that that isn't the best way to do things because my friends have done that and found out that they'd been lied to by the bum. How do we offer help in a smart way without being taken? I can't afford to research their situation myself, nor offer too much monetary help since I'm living paycheck to paycheck and all that. I don't know what the boundaries should be. I need to talk with someone who's been doing this for a while to tell me what works and what to watch out for.

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Wednesday, January 21, 2004

In preparing for this weeks sermon, I have been struck by Jesus' call to "preach the gospel to the poor" (Luke 4). The word for poor connotes the poorest of the poor or the destitute. I am reminded again that our mission must go to the neediest and most marginal folks. This isn't because God ignores others. He wants to demonstrate that his love is universal. If he only went to the strong and healthy, the weak and marginal might question if he is for them. But by going to the weakest, God shows that his love is for everyone. (Remember that in Luke Jesus ministered to and welcomed wealthy Zaccheus.)

This ministry to the marginal is about more than meeting needs - although it includs this. It is about showing what God's kingdom or reign is like. When God reigns, the rejected, downtrodden and poor no longer suffer. I am deeply challenged to reflect on how St. Patrick's is called to minister to the marginal. How are we called to "bring the good news to the poor?" How are we called to show what God's kingdom/reign is like? How does this relate to the call to make disciples?

Any thoughts or reflections?

Pax, Peter

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Saint Patrick's is now meeting in Lexington. Communality, a missional community rooted in urban Lexington, has graciously invited us to worship in their meeting space at the High Street House. Thanks Communality!!

The High Street House is at 112 W. High Street. We begin our worship at 10AM with refreshments afterward.

Pax, Peter

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